Whig


Whig
Whig British political party, 1657, in part perhaps a disparaging use of whigg "a country bumpkin" (1640s); but mainly a shortened form of Whiggamore (1649) "one of the adherents of the Presbyterian cause in western Scotland who marched on Edinburgh in 1648 to oppose Charles I." Perhaps originally "a horse drover," from dialectal verb whig "to urge forward" + MARE (Cf. mare). In 1689 the name was first used in reference to members of the British political party that opposed the Tories. American Revolution sense of "colonist who opposes Crown policies" is from 1768. Later it was applied to opponents of Andrew Jackson (as early as 1825), and taken as the name of a political party (1834) that merged into the Republican Party in 1854-56.
n the spring of 1834 Jackson's opponents adopted the name Whig, traditional term for critics of executive usurpations. James Watson Webb, editor of the New York [i]Courier and Enquirer, encouraged use of the name. [Henry] Clay gave it national currency in a speech on April 14, 1834, likening "the whigs of the present day" to those who had resisted George III, and by summer it was official. [Daniel Walker Howe, "What Hath God Wrought," 2007, p.390]
Whig historian is recorded from 1924. Whig history is "the tendency in many historians ... to emphasise certain principles of progress in the past and to produce a story which is the ratification if not the glorification of the present." [Herbert Butterfield, "The Whig Interpretation of History," 1931]

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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  • whig — whig …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • whig — [ wig ] n. • 1690; mot angl. 1 ♦ Hist. Au XVIIe s., Partisan du bill d exclusion voté contre le catholique duc d York. 2 ♦ Membre du parti libéral opposé aux torys, aux XVIIIe et XIXe s. Adj. « leurs adversaires whigs » (Madelin) …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Whig — may refer to:Political parties and factionsIn the United Kingdom* Kirk Party, a faction of the Scottish Covenanters during the 17th century Wars of the Three Kingdoms, and the original Whigs. (See also Whigg and Whiggamore Raid) * Whig (British… …   Wikipedia

  • whig — whig·ga·more; whig·gery; whig·gi·fy; whig·gish; whig·gish·ly; whig·gism; whig·ling; whig·ma·lee·rie; whig; whig·ism; whig·ma·lee·ry; …   English syllables

  • Whig — Whig, n. [Said to be from whiggam, a term used in Scotland in driving horses, whiggamore one who drives horses (a term applied to some western Scotchmen), contracted to whig. In 1648, a party of these people marched to Edinburgh to oppose the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • whig — s.m. Nume dat adversarilor ducelui de York, organizaţi într un partid care, după dezmembrarea partidului, la începutul sec. XIX, au intrat în partidul liberal englez. [pr.: uig] – cuv. engl. Trimis de cata, 27.02.2002. Sursa: DEX 98  whig s. m.… …   Dicționar Român

  • Whig — (pronunc. [uig]; pl. «whigs») adj. y n. Del partido liberal inglés. * * * El término Whig corresponde al antiguo nombre del partido Liberal británico. La denominación Partido Liberal comenzó a aplicarse a mediados del siglo XIX y a finales de… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • whig — /wig/, it. /wig/ s. ingl. [prob. abbrev. di Whiggamore, nome di un gruppo di insorti scozzesi, nel 1648], usato in ital. come s.m. e agg. ■ s.m. 1. (stor.) [partito storico dell Inghilterra fautore della tolleranza in campo religioso e degli… …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • Whig — [hwig, wig] n. [shortened form of whiggamore (applied to Scot Covenanters who marched on Edinburgh in 1648), an erratic form of Scot whiggamaire < whig, a cry to urge on horses + mare, horse] 1. a member of a political party in England (fl.… …   English World dictionary

  • Whig — Whig, a. Of or pertaining to the Whigs. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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