stomach


stomach
stomach c.1300, "internal pouch into which food is digested," from O.Fr. estomac, from L. stomachus "stomach, throat," also "pride, inclination, indignation" (which were thought to have their origin in that organ), from Gk. stomachos "throat, gullet, esophagus," lit. "mouth, opening," from stoma "mouth" (see STOMA (Cf. stoma)). Applied to the openings of various internal organs, especially the stomach, then to the stomach itself. Some 16c. anatomists tried to correct the sense back to "esophagus" and introduce ventricle for what we call the stomach. Meaning "belly, midriff, part of the body that contains the stomach" is from late 14c. Figurative senses in L. extended into M.E. (Cf. "relish, inclination, desire," 1510s). The verb meaning "to tolerate, put up with" is from 1570s; earlier sense was opposite: "to be offended at, resent" (1520s), from L. stomachari "to be resentful." Stomach ache is from 1763.

Etymology dictionary. 2014.

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